DNS SOA record explained

To properly understand DNS and its function, we must investigate each of the DNS records, how they work, and why they exist. There are many, but there are a few that we must understand from the start. This is why we will begin by explaining the DNS SOA record.

What is DNS SOA record?

The DNS SOA record is the start of authority. It is the beginning of the chain of authority that the DNS has. It will point which server, from all the nameservers that you have, contains the original zone file. This server will be the authoritative DNS server, and it will have all the important information about the zone.

Inside the DNS SOA record, there you can find information about the zone transfer, the rate of refreshing, and the rate for retry if not refreshed properly. Also, inside it, you will see the DNS administrator’s contact information.

Here you can find the structure of the DNS SOA record!

Continue reading “DNS SOA record explained”

DNS CNAME record explained

Expanding the knowledge about DNS records, we can’t skip another of the essential DNS CNAME record. 

DNS CNAME record explained

The full name of the CNAME record is Canonical name record. The Canonical Name is demonstrating which exactly is the real name of a domain. In that direction of thought, the DNS CNAME record serves the purpose to point which is the true canonical domain name of one domain name. 

Find out the most common uses of the CNAME record!

Continue reading “DNS CNAME record explained”

Dig command – how to use it?

The Dig command is one of the most popular NSlookup alternatives for Linux and macOS. Here we will show you how to use it for checking your domain and all its DNS records. 

What is the Dig command?

DIG is an abbreviation of Domain Information Groper, and it is a software with a command-line interface for domain probing. You can find the command on almost every Linux distro like CentOS, Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, and more.  

Continue reading “Dig command – how to use it?”